Ecuador Day 5: Otavalo & the Rose Farm

Ecuador: Hacienda Cusin

My last full day in Ecuador! I was feeling a bit emotional by this point in the trip: a little homesick and lonely (this was a solo press trip so no lovely travel gang like in Panama) but also unwilling to leave this beautiful country.

Ecuador: Hacienda Cusin
Ecuador: Hacienda Cusin
Ecuador: Hacienda Cusin
Ecuador: Hacienda Cusin

Ecuador: Hacienda Cusin

I woke up early so I had time to pad around the Hacienda Cusin‘s grounds before checking out. It was so peaceful, all you can hear are birds and frogs chirping away in the post-thunderstorm dew. Generally though, I’m not sure I’d stay here again. My room was a bit dank and musty and I didn’t like the log fire (mild pyrophobia, but cold without it!). It was also a pain to have to walk outside between the room, restaurant and reception in the dark and rain, and the food at dinner and breakfast was very bland. As I said though, the grounds are calm and pretty and if you’re into the rustic farmhouse-outdoorsy vibe you’d probably like it. The hacienda can organise horse treks and various other local visits and outdoor activities, so maybe it’s better suited to more adventurous types.

Otavalo

I was excited about today’s visits: with a huge crafts market, a waterfall and a rose farm on the agenda it promised to be a fittingly magical final day. First stop was the town of Otavalo which is known for its daily market, selling everything from spices, grains and meat to Andean textiles and bags, wood and leather goods and typical tourist souvenirs. The market is on every day but Saturday is the biggest and busiest day.

Otavalo
Otavalo

Otavalo

Otavalo
Otavalo

The market was a real treat to browse. I especially liked it because it wasn’t entirely geared up for tourists: plenty of locals were shopping too and I didn’t feel hassled by any sellers. It was also so big that it wasn’t overly crowded and there was plenty of shade to dodge the hot sun. It’s centred on a main plaza but continues down the side streets over a 3 or 4 block radius. Naturally I had to do a lap of everything once before deciding where to spend my cash!

Otavalo
Otavalo

You could also grab regular refreshments from street sellers – coconut water, iced pops, sorbet and fruit juices – for 20-50 cents when the heat got too much. I also got a great iced coffee from the friendly chap above.

Otavalo
Otavalo

There was a dizzying array of goods and it took me a little while to get into the swing of haggling in my very weak Spanish (I made a note of how to say numbers and ‘how much is it’ before visiting!). It wasn’t a problem as the prices are pretty cheap anyway. I spent about $40 and came home with some carved wooden spoons, two small Andean blankets and two lengths of fabric, and a nice bag bag to transport all my new acquisitions home in.

Otavalo

It’s just a short drive from the market to another Otavalo treat, a stunning natural waterfall, Casacda de Peguche.

Otavalo

When the sun shines on it, you see a beautiful full-arc rainbow in the spray. Just when you think Ecuador can’t throw any more natural beauty at you, this happens!

Otavalo

The waterfall is surrounded by a pretty forest where you can camp overnight in a tent or one of these guest lodges.

Otavalo
Otavalo

Just outside the forest you can visit a little workshop of traditional musical instruments from Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. We had a demonstration of the main instruments from the owner and he made a set of pipes from bamboo right in front of us in about ten minutes.

Otavalo

I bought one of these little ceramic critters for Josh – you make notes by blowing into his mouth and covering the holes to make notes.

Ecuador: Hacienda Pinsaqui

We stayed nearby for lunch at the Hacienda Pinsaqui, an old texile-weaving centre and stopping-off point on the road between Ibarra and Quito. Dating from the early 18th century, Simon Bolivar was a famous guest and it’s now a restored hotel. It was even prettier than the hacienda I stayed in, and the lunch was probably the best food of the trip.

Ecuador: Hacienda Pinsaqui
Ecuador: Hacienda Pinsaqui
Ecuador: Hacienda Pinsaqui

Ceviche of heart of palm followed by a platter of veggie corn-based treats. We were serenaded by a band as we ate which was really nice.

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús
Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

On the road back to Quito, we made our final stop at the Compañía de Jesús Hacienda, a really beautiful place with a fascinating story. It was originally a Jesuit church and grain farm, but the Jesuits were expelled from Ecuador amidst fears they were getting too powerful, so this land and its buildings were bought by a wealthy Ecuadorian family. It’s been owned by the same family now for five generations, and the son-in-law of the current owners showed me around.

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús
Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

The land is now a rose plantation which busily exports to mainly the USA, Europe and Russia. It was a quiet time for my visit because Mothers’ Day had just passed so production was slowing down for a bit. In higher season you can actually see the rose farm and processing methods. Instead I saw the permanent showroom in the old grain store building, which showcases some of the 70 varieties of rose grown on the farm. My guide explained that new varieties are cultivated in the lab, and the shapes and colours change with fashion and demand.

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús
Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús
Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

Aren’t these lilac ones dreamy?

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

We then saw the old Jesuit chapel, where five generations of the same family have been married. The restored interior features paintings and sculptures dating from the time of the Jesuits.

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús
Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús
Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

Finally we got to look in the estate house. Dating from 1919 and built in the neo-classical French style, the interior has been immaculately designed to fit the age of the building. Some furniture was shipped over from Europe; some was reproduced in the same style by local Ecuadorian craftspeople.

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús
Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

The beautiful wallpapers are French originals, as are the moulded tin ceilings from Germany.

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús
Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

From the gramophone to pillar box hats hanging by the door, the attention to detail makes this house like stepping back in time. However it’s very much a lived-in and loved house; the owners spend a lot of time here and the whole family descends at weekends.

Ecuador: Compañía de Jesús

Roses are a permanent feature, of course. We were treated to some freshly-baked bizcochos (a local specialty, crumbly corn biscuits), local cheese and blackberry juice as we admired the house. You can stay at the hacienda or tour its grounds by appointment only. I can’t find a website but here’s some more info in Spanish.

This was my last stop of the whole trip, so after the journey back to Cafe Cultura in Quito I spent the evening re-packing all my souvenirs and resting. In the morning there was just time for the tasty hotel breakfast, and another stroll to Eiji park, which on a Sunday had a lovely relaxed vibe with kids playing football, families on bike rides and a small craft and paintings market. A fitting way to say goodbye! Adieu Ecuador, I hope we’ll meet again one day.

My trip was sponsored by KLM and Branding Latin America / Quito Turismo UK; views as ever are my own