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Mexico City: eats, drinks and markets

Obviously, one of our main reasons for visiting Mexico was for the food. London has some good Mexican places but I was really interested to see how the real stuff compares – and what actually constitutes a real Mexican dish and which are fake exports. I’m looking at you, burritos. In general we ate really well, almost always going for Mexican food (not that there is that much foreign food around anyway – mostly Italian, Argentinian or American places) and we tried the whole gamut from 50p streetside tacos to a high-end tasting menu at supposedly the best restaurant in Mexico City. I was pleased to find that it wasn’t hard at all to find vegetarian options nearly everywhere – and honestly, they looked a heck of a lot more appealing than a lot of the meat!

Mexico City

Breakfast is a fun meal. You can go for pastries and coffee at one of the many bakeries around (Mexicans seem to love pastries and sweet breads – pan dulce) or go bigger and local with some huevos smothered in salsa, rancheros or chilaquiles style. We had a great coffee shop called Chiquitito around the corner from our Airbnb in Condesa, where we stopped for cortados, yogurt and croissants on a couple of days. We had a good Mexican style breakfast up the road at El Pendula, a cosy bookshop come cafe.

Mexico City

Mexico City
Mexico City

Lunch is generally the main meal of the day in Mexico and they take it late – around 3pm. One of my favourite lunches was at Cate de mi Corazon, an entirely vegetarian taco place right by our Airbnb in Condesa. Some of the flavours were a bit odd to our palate (such as a sweet jamaica – hibiscus flower – filling) but my enchiladas – stuffed tortillas smothered in red salsa – were really tasty.

Mexico City
Mexico City

Probably the best meal we had of the entire trip was a decadent late lunch at Limosneros, a really beautiful restaurant just south of the Zocalo in Centro. The building dates from the 16th century and the restaurant was started 100 years ago by the current chef’s grandfather. There wasn’t much veggie choice admittedly, but my hibiscus flautas and charred chile and pineapple salad with soft goats’ cheese were absolutely stunning. Josh’s cochinita pibil looked brilliant too. And dessert was peanut butter and jam ice cream! It was a pretty fancy place but the bill was a very reasonable $750/£40.

Mexico City
Mexico City

Before we left the UK we booked dinner at Pujol after reading this New York Times article with Rene Redzepi of Noma. Supposedly the best – and definitely the most expensive – meal in the city, we could only get a booking for early on Tuesday night, the day after we flew in. Unfortunately I was quite disappointed by it overall. It’s undeniably elegant (in a friendly and laid-back kind of way) and they do put on a whole veggie tasting menu and some dishes were great, such as baby corn smoked over wood and served in a hollow pumpkin, but overall it was so rich I was feeling a bit queasy by halfway through and trying to hide how little I could eat. With a whopping £70 a head price tag it was a real shame.

Mexico City

A muuuuch cheaper lunch or dinner option is to grab some antojitos (snacks) from a street vendor, hole in the wall or cafe. They can also taste fantastic if you pick wisely. We had some filling tortas and cold beers in a cute old-school cafe in Centro, and great tacos for $17 a go at Tacos Hola/El Guerro, a tiny place with a few bar stools and pavement tables near our Airbnb on Avenida Amsterdam. He cooks up several different fillings a night, including quite a few veg options, and you can just keep ordering til you’re full.

Mexico City

For drinkin’, the national drink of mezcal is clearly the way to go. We did a mezcal tasting tour in Oaxaca which I’ll write about later (I’m quite the mezcal fact file now) but the local Alipus artisanal mezcal bar was a good place to start. Plus there’s local beer: El Deposito has a great range of local and world craft beers in its few bars dotted over the city. You can buy to take away or drink in.

Mexico City
Mexico City

On a classier note, we had a great night at Licorería Limantour in Roma, one of the world’s 50 best cocktail bars, drinking mezcal cocktails and chatting to the lovely bartender. He sent us on our way with mezcal shots for the road and some recipe cards to take home.

Mexico City
Mexico City

Mexico City
Mexico City

When we weren’t actually eating, one of our favourite things to do was to trawl around the many food markets. One of the best and largest is San Juan, which is right in the kitchen wholesale district just south of the Zocalo and apparently where chefs go to shop. Those morels! Knobbly little squashes! And SO MUCH hot sauce…

Mexico City
Mexico City

There’s good craft and souvenir market at La Ciudadela; we bought some thick blown glass drinking tumblers, $130/£6.50 for six. Oaxaca was the real place to buy crafts though, as I’ll tell you about later.

Mexico sewing stuff

I hunted down some fabric shops, a must-do for me on any trip these days. I wrote more about them on my sewing blog. There seems to be one big fabric shop chain called Parisina are mostly grouped in the streets around Uruguay just south of the Zocalo (there’s a couple in Oaxaca too). Most of the fabrics are pretty gaudy synthetic polys – especially novelty printed fleece and, I suppose especially at this time of year, Day of the Dead and Hallowe’en themed stuff – but there were also some wools, poplins and pretty plaids. It was all dead cheap, mostly ranging from $15/80p to $60/£3 a metre, so a little bit came home with me…

Mexico City

Mexico City
Mexico City

We were woefully under-researched on our other favourite pastime, flea markets, but luckily snuck a great one in on our very last Saturday morning before catching the bus to Oaxaca. It snaked right around the Jardin Pushkin near the eastern end of Avenida Alvaro Obregon and contained a great range of goodies from vintage videogame cartridges to dead-stock stationery. It was pretty expensive, making me think it’s more of a collectors market than bargain flea. I only came home with a little tin for 100 pesos.

Mexico City

We actually did pop to another flea in between our flight back from Oaxaca and the connecting flight to London the following Saturday, at Plaza del Angel. This is a little indoor mall full of antiques shops, which on the weekend spill their wares onto the walkways for a flea-style experience. There was a lot of fun stuff, from vintage film posters to tiny toy sewing machines (how did I resist?) and prices were reasonable. I bought a little ceramic owl for the collection and some paper ephemera.

Mexico City

In terms of non-market shopping, Avenida Amsterdam in Condesa has a bunch of nice boutiques (as well as restaurants and bars) and is a lovely leafy area to wander around. Avenida Alvaro Obregon and Calle Comida in Roma are good to check out foody delis and little vintage shops. We even found a hipster yard sale in full swing on Saturday, and now I’m wondering why London boot sales don’t come complete with artisanal g&t and bagel stands.

Mexico City

My favourite find was a tiny boutique off Av Alvaro Obregon called Ursa Minor, which the owner has beautifully curated with homewares and crafted items from local designers. We bought a mini skull artwork handpainted on wood, some pretty ceramics, and some other little gifts.

All these places – plus a bunch more places we didn’t get the chance to make it to – are on my Google map and Foursquare list.

¡Hola, Mexico!

Mexico

We’re back from two weeks in Mexico – tanned, tired and well padded out with cheese and chocolate. We spent a week in Mexico City and a week in Oaxaca – it was really good to see perhaps two extremes of the same country. Here’s a first bunch of photos and my thoughts on our first stop, Mexico City.

Mexico

We were almost put off Mexico City (known locally as DF, District Federal) before going, with the consensus being it’s too big, crowded, hectic and completely impenetrable for a short visit. Luckily I didn’t find that to be the case at all. I think that was partly the neighbourhood we stayed in, Condesa, and the lovely Airbnb we called temporary home (this one) which was a great base to return to and chill out for a bit in between scampering around. Condesa is a really nice quiet area, but with loads of restaurants, bars, shops and cafes. It borders the more buzzy Roma and Zona Rosa and isn’t too far from the historical centre either. It reminded me of London in the way each neighbourhood has a distinct vibe so you can choose where to hang out based on your mood. The Chilangos (inhabitants of DF) also reminded me of Londoners – they’ll generally stay out of your way but be friendly and helpful if you’re looking for it.

Mexico
Mexico

One thing that really surprised me was how green a city it is. There are lush tropical planted parks every few blocks which break up the concrete. Mexico City is pretty pleasant to take in on foot once you get used to the uneven pavements and, er, unorthodox approach to traffic lights and pedestrian crossings (we quickly learned to just go when a local crosses!). It’s very clean in terms of litter and it felt safe to walk around areas like Condesa and Roma after dark. Plus the weather in mid-late October was in the mid-20s, perfect for wandering around.

Mexico

Other options for longer trips include taxis and the metro. Taxis are very cheap and safe as long as you book them from the ranks situated every couple of blocks – $100/£5 will get you anywhere in the centre. The Metro is even cheaper – at $4/20p it’s amongst the cheapest in the world – and generally a safe bet. On the downside, it got hot and sticky at peak time (5-6pm and onward) and also had a tendency to make long stops with no announcements as to what’s going on. There are women and children only carriages at the front of every train but I didn’t feel the need to use them. There are also buses and hire bikes, which we didn’t try. I’ll show some of the other areas we visited a bit later on.

Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico

Like Ecuador and Panama, there’s colour everywhere, from handpainted signs to ornately tiled buildings.

Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico

Food is everywhere too, at all hours! Street food shacks and carts on ever corner offering every variety of corn + meat + cheese you can imagine – I’m now well-versed in telling a memelita from a tlayuda. If you were on a budget you could eat street food three times a day for about $50 pesos (£2.50). The pound is pretty strong right now, which made everything seem pretty bargainous to us anyway. We ate a vast variety of amazing food, from 50p street tacos to allegedly the highest-end restaurant in Mexico – I’ll post more about my favourites. We even found veggie restaurants! In fact eating veggie there was really quite easy: a fondness for cheese will definitely help though.

Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico

Another highlight for me was the volume of markets – my idea of heaven is walking around a fresh produce market; even if I can’t buy the fruit and veg I love to see what’s available and how deliciously vibrant it all looks. Plus of course there’s all manner of stuff we could bring home, like dried chillies, hot sauce, chocolate and crafts… I’ll write some more about specific markets later.

Mexico

Lots more to come soon on what we saw, did and ate!

A week with a veg box

veg

My cooking has had a boost lately, thanks to both a neighbour plying me with veg from her Norfolk allotment and Wholegood kindly sending me a veg box to try.

veg
It’s been nice to try some ingredients that I don’t often buy for myself, and it’s much easier to make a non-lazy carb-based dinner when you’ve got a veg drawer overflowing with this colourful loveliness.

vegbox1

Greens are some of my favourite veg, as long as they’re carefully cooked so as to keep their crunch and colour. The mix on the left is broccoli, chard and leek which I semi-steamed in a pan with a cup of hot water with the lid on. I served it simply with seasoning and lemon as a side dish (um, to macaroni cheese). On the right, a bit of a made-up tart of the same veg together with some stilton cheese in a quiche type custard nestled in filo pastry.

vegbox2

Left, a filling tea of a sot of tartiflette (oven-baked patties of grated potato and courgette with taleggio cheese – I modified this recipe) with a saucy chickpea, tomato and spinach side. Right, a surprisingly filling solo dinner of Portobello mushrooms topped with stilton, breadcrumbs and parmesan. I didn’t need anything else with them – truly the steak of the veg world.

vegbox3

I love tomatoes at this time of year, especially when roasted to concentrate their flavour. Left, using up the last of the filo with a roasted tomato, onion and mozzarella tart (with some of Josh’s chilli chutney smeared on the base). Right, a roasted tomato soup which did me for three work-at-home lunches. I also used a huge glut of spinach for more soup, which is waiting in the freezer.

veg

Of the new things I tried, two things I’ll definitely buy again are leeks and chard. They are both robust enough to last a good week or more in the fridge, which is important as I really don’t like to throw food away. Leeks give that oniony savouryness to any meal, but can also be the star of a dish when griddled or roasted. I use chard rather like spinach: chucked into anything saucy near the end of cooking to give a bit of texture and bump up the veg count. What are your veg box favourites?

Veg box supplied by Wholegood for review

Gratuitous cat update

Cats

It’s been a while since I posted about the cats! I snap photos of them every so often when they’re being extra-cute so thought I’d share some of them here.

Cats

Yoni is fully recovered from his ordeal over a year ago – he got an all-clear from the vet and no further issues since, which we’re so grateful about. It’s just possibly made him even more of a demanding diva than he was previously.

His favourite things are…

Cats

Looking ponderous while half-upside down.

Cats

His grey stripy cat friend and grey blanky

Fabric cat

Napping in my fabric stash

Cats

Napping while holding his tail

Cats

Napping rolled in a snail-like ball… napping anywhere really.

Cats

He still likes to potter outside but doesn’t venture as far any more.

Cats

Our cats are basically opposites in terms of personality – which might explain why they still don’t really get on at all. Lila is super laid-back and likes to tuck herself off in a lesser-used room (currently Josh’s study, often under the radiator in the hallway) and snooze to herself all evening. On the occasion she does want some attention, she raises her little paw in the air and purrs like crazy.

Her favourite things are…

Cats

Rolling around getting grubby

Cats

Chilling in plant pots

Cats

Wearing hats

Cats

Napping flat on her back, tail and paws in the air

Cats

Her rainbow. She also, less adorably, loves to pounce on fabric and pattern pieces when I’m sewing.

Ah cats. They keep life interesting at least!

In partnership with Argos Cat Insurance

Just Good Friday

friday

1. This article about the ‘real’ history behind the Madewell brand is a fascinating and balanced long read.

2. Photos of Indian cinemas.

3. ‘At the turn of the century, Louis Wain became a household name as The Man Who Drew Cats’… I like him.

4. We had a brilliant dinner at Finks last weekend – the kind of neighbourhood restaurant you’d always want to live near.

5. Sewists recreate childhood clothes for their own daughters. My mum used to make matching clothes for my sister and me… maybe I should dig out some photos and try to remake them.